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Poll Results for the following Question:

Do you believe acupuncture publications should adhere to a standard set of guidelines for formatting words, names of herbs, acupuncture point locations, etc.?

Results:

Yes
86.4%
No
13.6%

Total Respondents: 302

Comments:

Note: These comments are reproduced as written by visitors to this Web site.
They have not been edited for content, grammar, or spelling.


al_zahra110@hotmail.com
Yes the machine of aculife was change of my life that is the fantastic envention of acupunture.

regards

dr, shahid

Anonymous
Yes I belief herbal and holistic healing is just as or more effective that traditional western medicine. it should be regarded as that

awsiddiqui_physio@yahoo.com
 Dear Sir,
I'm Physical Therapist and have keen interest in learning Accupuncture/Accupressure.Kindly inform me about meridians & Accu.points.I have completed a course in Su-Jok accupuncture.Pl acknowledge this mail.
thanks with regards.
A.W.Siddiqui(Physio)

fulcanelli@netvisao.pt
Yes bom

bogdanrouytchev@yahoo.com
 Actualy it`s impossible to write anything about TCM (or IOM) without TRIGRAMES whiches mean the axises Tai Yang,Yang Ming,Shao Yang,Tsue In,Shao In,Tai In and which we "know" only by the Korean flug!(E.g. from the last World`s Soccer Competition).I`m surprised noone tells about this origin of the Traditional Chinese Diagnozis&Treatment?! If somebody explain me why they are not existed in the specialisated jurnals I`ll accept it. So I say "NO". Dr B.R.,MD

bogdanrouytchev@yahoo.com
 Actualy it`s impossible to write anything about TCM (or IOM) without TRIGRAMES whiches mean the axises Tai Yang,Yang Ming,Shao Yang,Tsue In,Shao In,Tai In and which we "know" only by the Korean flug!(E.g. from the last World`s Soccer Competition).I`m surprised noone tells about this origin of the Traditional Chinese Diagnozis&Treatment?! If somebody explain me why they are not existed in the specialisated jurnals I`ll accept it. Dr B.R.,MD

Anonymous
Yes Standardisation does not mean loss of diversity as some respondants are stating. Standardisation however should be grounded in unambiguous concrete terms. That is, irrespective of the reader/speaker each practitioner should be interpreting a particular term similarly. Accordingly, if a particular term has a number of interpretations then use a number of different terms to capture each of the connotations that it could potentially represent; maintain the 'diversity' without compromising communication.

Anonymous
No Translations reflect the attitude and orientation of the translator. To unify translation is indeed to become like boimedicine in that it would limit perspective, deny dialog, narrow vision and create a process where there would be a "correct" and thereby allowable translation. This would lead to "correct" and allowable styles and perspectives in acupuncture as well. All we need to ask translators to do is include the Chinese character and or pinyin source word. This would create a wonderful ongoing dialogue of translations of these terms which would allow those not fluent in the source language a multitude of perspectives and orientations to the translation of Chinese medical texts and at the same time eliminate confusion as to the word or phrase being discussed.

Anonymous
Yes This should be a formal process, beginning with a draft by a voluntary committee of leaders in the profession. The AAOM and significant international organizations should participate. Western medical authorities and legislators should also have a chance to see the draft so that the final listing receives as much exposure as possible.

Anonymous
Yes absoulutly fabulous

Anonymous
Yes crap

Anonymous
No acupuncture is a good thing it is great

noneofyourbusiness@noneofyourbusiness.com
No AcupunctureToday.com reserves the right to edit or delete posts containing inappropriate language. Please keep your comments on a professional level.



Anonymous
No I am against standardization because the industry seems intent on standardizing by using the most awkward translations possible. Wiseman's use of vacuity instead of deficiency is an excellent example.

rtoo@earthlink.net
Yes Standardization would be helpful for the profession - up to a point. Unfortunately, due to the inordinate influence of the Blue Poppy/Nigel Wiseman contingent in translated Chinese texts and articles, this has tended to be the default standardization language. I, personally, find this language cumbersome and incredibly obtuse. If Wisemans lexicon were to become the standard for formatting articles and publications, it would be a setback rather than a step forward.

Anonymous
Yes According to the New Merriam-Webster Dictionary:

VACUOS: empty, vacant, blank, dull, stupid, inane.
DEFICIENT: lacking in something necessary (as forcompletness or health); defective.

I vote for the clearly defined terms such as Deficiency.

Anonymous
Yes As a teacher at a college of Oriental Medicine I can say that
one of the hardest things for new students who cannot read
Chinese or Japanese is the randomness and lack of
uniformity in translation. This lack of uniformity often leads
students to believe that Oriental Medicine does not have a
precise language like western biomedicine.

As someone who reads both Japanese and Chinese I can
say that in both traditions medical terms have specific
meanings that when understood precisely lead one to a
more concrete understanding of the therapy used and the
reason behind that therapy. While it is true that traditions do
disagree on many things, what is not true is that a specific
medical term can understood any way a practitioner likes.
Chinese (and Japanese) medicine are much more precise.

A uniform translation system (I actually do prefer Nigel
Weisman's terms) will help establish Oriental Medicine as a
medical system on par with western biomedicine and will
also allow a real dialog between practitioners of all
traditions.


Anonymous
No I think we should move toward that as a goal of
communication, however there may be
differences due to chinese, korean, japanese, etc
styles of acupuncture that may be lost in
standardizing the translations. Remember that all
translation is inherently deviated from the original.
Nor does everyone agree on locations of all the
points. Losing that may mean loss of
effectiveness and diversity in our medicine.

gentleht@earthlink.net
Yes This is a difficult topic to state in a few words. The goal of
communication between different types of practioners is
important. Eliminating confusion over which species of plant we
are reffering to is also important. Having point numbers and pin
yin and having herbs in pin yin and latin are probably the best
for communication. Describing agreed upon locations or
chanels in Chinese type descriptions and english or biomedical
western descriptions also seems inclusive and accurate.

Anonymous
Yes It is highly recommended that publications of acupuncture journals adhere to the standard process of naming herbs, format, or location. It will make it easier for the public.

Anonymous
Yes While I do not any advocate formatting guidelines that would make it harder for practitioners around the world to submit articles to an acupuncture publication, I do think it might be a good idea to have a codified format for indicating names of herbs and acupuncture points. This seems especially important with herbs, where the Chinese or common name for an herb may apply to several plant species, or where a single species may go by several different Chinese or common names. Giving both a Chinese name and a species designation would be safer.

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