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Acupuncture Today
March, 2008, Vol. 09, Issue 03
 
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Untangling the Meridians With CranioSacral Therapy

By Kenneth R. Koles, PhD, DSc, RAc, LMT

Acupuncture and CranioSacral Therapy (CST) are two wonderfully effective modalities of healing that utilize the body's wisdom to heal itself. Both of them use cycles of energy flow rhythms.

In Taoist acupuncture, the body can be seen as a sea of qi.

The meridians are the currents which flow through this sea. And the craniosacral rhythms are the waves, which are in constant motion through the body. Untangling the meridians is the technique of using the craniosacral rhythm to optimize the flow of qi in the channels. By feeling the craniosacral rhythm at the first and last points of a meridian, you can tap into the intelligence of that official. Then by connecting these points, the whole meridian can communicate with itself to optimize its flow and function. Rather than focusing on moving the qi through the channel, the focus is on getting the channel to untangle itself.

Feeling the craniosacral rhythm of a point is a simple way to communicate with the energies of that point and also the whole meridian. With just a non-force contact of skin on skin you can sense the craniosacral rhythm with your fingers. Usually a six-second cycle of three seconds of expanding and three seconds of contracting or rocking back and forth is the sensation you will have.

Once you can feel the craniosacral rhythm at one point, then you can communicate with its flow. As the movement of the acupoint comes into your awareness, you can untangle the point with intention to bring the motion to a place of harmony. Once you tune into the rhythm of one point, you can focus on the other points to become aware of their individual motions. To untangle a meridian, simply focus on the first and last points of that channel, one point at a time and then both together. By contacting both points with your intention, you can sense the movement all through the meridians. Then be with the meridian, intending it the energy and clarity to untangle any blocks or gaps in its flow.

Untangling the meridians has been very useful in musculoskeletal problems, organ issues and also in systemic imbalances. For example, take a look at the following case history.

Walter came into my office with a frozen left shoulder and a numb left hand. After inserting the needles, I untangled the meridians in the left arm and shoulder. Holding the first and last point of all the hand meridians, one channel at a time, brought surprise to Walter. The focus was on feeling the whole meridian between my fingers and asking it to untangle itself for optimal well-being. Suddenly, Walter opened his eyes wide and asked, "What was that?" "What was what?" "The electrical shock that went down my arm," he said. "That was the short circuit in your arm that froze your shoulder and blocked the energy going to your hand," I responded.

Then Walter moved his arm over his head and in all directions. He could not do any of this when he came in. Next, he sat up and swung his arm all over with a big smile on his face. Walter was 79 years old at the time and his left arm had not gone over his head in 17 years. His numb left hand was just fine as well. When the lines of communication are untangled the officials can do their jobs most easily.

This is one of many happy experiences combining acupuncture and CST. Practitioners seem to easily pick up this technique and have been reporting great results for many years. Perhaps you will have an opportunity to untangle some meridians and enjoy the results.


Kenneth R. Koles is an instructor with The Upledger Institute and teaches Applying Acupuncture Principles to CranioSacral Therapy. He has a family practice in Shaker Heights, Ohio.


 

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