qi


Acupuncture Today
April, 2009, Vol. 10, Issue 04
 
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Remembering the Essential Truth of Who We Are, Part 2

By Peter Fairfield, LAc

In part one of this article (December 2008), I discussed the possibility of making a shift in our basic clinical viewpoint that involves discovering and seeing the place of basic wellness, and even goodness in our clients, and then building our treatments from that premise. If they are alive, these qualities exist somewhere within them, although trauma and difficulty sometimes make them hard to find. Treatment then encompasses uncovering the blocks, and emotional, social and karmic patterns that hinder or cover this basic emanation of our life essence. These take the form of disease and imbalance, but are actually the influence and momentum of quantum intelligence working to find resolution in the knots and patterns held within the structures of our physical, conceptual and energetic bodies. This viewpoint not only returns power to each individual, but offers us, as healers, a very conscious and tuned-in place to begin, and a perspective that can guide each of us as part of a renewed and powerful force of humanity, serving and assisting in ways that are fruitful and desperately needed in our chaotic and evolving world.

Recently, I have come into contact with two startling scientific findings that opened me further into the deeper workings of our innate biological and energetic connection to our living universe. The first is the discovery by modern physics concerning the quantum vacuum (or plenum), which states that there is more energy in one cubic centimeter of empty space than there is in all the matter in the universe. The second is the finding from the 1970s (and later confirmed in the 1990s) that the amount of energy needed and utilized for the movement and activation of our muscles and many other metabolic activities exceeds the biological energy supplied by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and other material sources; more energy is used than is supplied by our biological activity.

These findings clearly match the teachings of the ancient medical and spiritual wisdom traditions that all describe an infinite source of qi, prana, life force or consciousness that is ever present and is the real foundation of our biological existence. We do not yet have all the details of this universal energy that supports and activates the biological systems of animate life, but as physicians whose healing system is based on qi, we are close.

In my almost 40 years of clinical and transformational work, it has become so obvious that it is resistance to this infinite pervasive consciousness, either through contraction (excess), exclusion (deficiency) or misalignment (imbalance) which is the deepest cause of all the subtle and gross manifestations we call pathology.

To tie this together, I think it is clear that the objective and subjective experience of essential wellness and goodness is the expression of the infinite within the container of our biology and energetic fields. So let's take a very brief look at several of the systems that are the most basic to this process.

Since yin and yang are a fundamental premise of the Chinese medical system, I will start with the ren and du relationship. The degree of open expressiveness with and between this most fundamental polarity affects all physical and energetic systems in the body, the primary tenets of personality and even the latency or expression of the fundamental prenatal or karmic influences. When expression and feelings are held in, it impedes and minimizes the "bandwidth" between the ren and du and thus reduces the power in the field of our vital force or qi. This is a more general and overall effect than those exerted by specific organs. I have researched the details of this specific relationship for more than 14 years, particularly the idea that it this ren/du "bandwidth" that seems to hold the residue of all parental bonding issues within the shifting field of polarity.

In the most basic terms, we know that yang is upright, firm, expressive and outwardly strong. These are the most general qualities of a healthy du. Yin is receptive, soft, reflective and inwardly strong, which are therefore healthy qualities of a balanced ren. In my extensive work with anxiety, depression, boundary issues and creative expression, I have found it clinically very useful to include points on the ren and du meridians whenever one or both these essential attributes need fortifying, sometimes only treating one or both polarities by themselves. Then we will want to assess and, if needed, balance the other six of the eight Extras in both divisions and the three octaves.

Next, we must consider the heart. It is the first organ to function so we know how important it must be to our biological system as a whole. The heart houses the shen or spirit. Balancing, energizing and integrating this essential seat of love and consciousness creates a unity with in all the zang/fu. It is the primary source of radiance in our bodies.

From there, establishing presence and balance within the three jiaos creates a container that along with the energetic grid of the eight Extras holds the heart shen and expresses our unity. This also allows the union of the shao yin, thereby connecting our Earth ancestral wisdom energy with that of heaven and our innate spiritual alignment. Balancing these larger and global systems in the body offers an intrinsic support to the organs and brain and greatly eases the release of trauma and toxicity, because they open and strengthen our connection to heaven and Earth.

In these simple things, we can serve humanity in great ways. Do not doubt who we are or the gift that we bring.

 

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